EYMM – Women’s California Dresses & Peplum Top

I’m super far behind with posting what I’ve been sewn up lately. Danny left today to go work out of town for an undetermined time. Gotta love 1 week+ jobs. What does that even mean? 1 week+? He starts tomorrow, so we should know more then.

Getting back on topic…. Oh right. I have a chance to get caught up with Danny out of town. Let’s dive right in, shall we.

I had the opportunity to test for EYMM again. The first time around I tested the Piko Top, which you can read about here. This time, I had the opportunity to test the Women’s California Dress & Peplum Top. Here are my honest thoughts.

CALIFORNIA ALL THE WARDROBE!

Seriously! I love it! Love it! LOVE IT!!

I made three during testing. Three! And if I didn’t have other tests I was working on, I would have just locked myself away in my sewing room until my closet was bursting with Californias.

Let’s talk about the pattern really quick, which can be found here. Included in the pattern are four different lengths – peplum, above knee, below knee, and ankle length maxi. There’s also bonus hi-low hemline included. That’s not all. The dress is designed to be reversible. Use the front as the back, or the back as the front. It doesn’t really matter, it’s all up to your personal preference. The waistline is done with elastic, and Kymy includes information on how to move this up to make an empire waistline – perfect for maternity. My only word of caution with moving the elastic waistline up is to baste it first. If your bust is larger or smaller then the recommended move might not be ideal for you. I moved mine up less than recommended to accommodate my bust. HOWEVER, I used a triple stretch stitch my first time around. Yeah, that’s an annoying stitch to unpick. Just baste first until you have your empire line perfect for you. One more awesome feature – NURSING MOD! Yeah. You can wear something adorable, and nursing friendly. Do you see why I want to California All The Wardrobe yet?

Oh, and if you are pregnant and considering this pattern (or any maternity pattern, really) then download the FREE Make It Maternity Add-On, found here. Seriously, do it! No more baby bump hanging out tops that are too short, or worrying that you bump is making your dress rise up a wee bit too high. It’s a great little tool. I used it on two of my testers.

Oh. AND guess what. SALE!! Kymy is turning 30 and to celebrate she’s having a sale. Use coupon code MAMATURNS30 to receive 30% off your ENTIRE order at EYMM. That code can even be used on bundles. Code is good from May 9th – May 12th until 11:59PM PST. Don’t forget to add the Women’s Calfornia to your cart. Or the Girl’s California, if you’re not feeling like sewing for yourself. Or you could take serious advantage of the sale and add the California Bundle! You can read more about the sale details here. UPDATE: Kymy just posted this to Facebook. Yeah, take advantage of the sale before it is over!

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This simple little universal add-on is a one-size-fits-most solution to help you turn your favorite top, tunic and dress patterns into a maternity-friendly wardrobe.  When I was pregnant with #4 and #5, I decided to skip the expensive or unflattering maternity clothes currently in stores and wear regular tops and dresses that were either fitted and stretchy or flowy.  The only problem was near the end they were all getting to short!  So I used this method to make some longer maternity clothes that I could easily trim and re-hem into regular tops when I was done having babies.

This is a tutorial add-on that is 2 pages and includes just 2 small pieces.  The 2 included pieces are used to alter the paper pattern piece of almost any pattern that’s front piece is cut on a fold.

– See more at: http://www.eymm.com/product/make-it-maternity/#sthash.wEwehJW3.dpuf

Photo 2014-04-28, 6 41 13 PM Photo 2014-04-28, 6 41 20 PM

For my first test, I made the maxi length, with the empire waistline. Actually, I made it a little longer than the ankle maxi length. Probably a wee bit too long for me. I still love it. I opted to use two of the front pattern pieces to make this one. I also chose to serge and flip my armholes and neckline. Originally that was an option during testing, but as you can see from my bra peeking out, there was some issues with that. That’s why patterns are tested. To see what works and what doesn’t. I still love it and keep saying I’m just going to take it in a bit, but I still haven’t. And yes, I’ve worn it out in public, admittedly with a cardigan over top.

Photo 2014-04-28, 6 37 13 PM Photo 2014-04-28, 6 43 07 PM Photo 2014-04-29, 8 54 45 PM

For my second test, I made the peplum length, but with the raised empire waist. Does that still count as a peplum? Again, I opted to use two of the front pattern pieces to make this one, and do the serge and flip on my armholes and neckline. I also added the maternity add-on to both the front and back. You don’t need to add it to the front and back, it’s actually just suppose to go in the front. These are the mistakes I make when I choose to cut fabric while the girls are awake. I love this one. I wear it all the time. It’s super cute with leggings! Just saying!

Photo 2014-04-29, 8 12 26 PM

This simple little universal add-on is a one-size-fits-most solution to help you turn your favorite top, tunic and dress patterns into a maternity-friendly wardrobe.  When I was pregnant with #4 and #5, I decided to skip the expensive or unflattering maternity clothes currently in stores and wear regular tops and dresses that were either fitted and stretchy or flowy.  The only problem was near the end they were all getting to short!  So I used this method to make some longer maternity clothes that I could easily trim and re-hem into regular tops when I was done having babies.

This is a tutorial add-on that is 2 pages and includes just 2 small pieces.  The 2 included pieces are used to alter the paper pattern piece of almost any pattern that’s front piece is cut on a fold.

– See more at: http://www.eymm.com/product/make-it-maternity/#sthash.wEwehJW3.dpuf

This simple little universal add-on is a one-size-fits-most solution to help you turn your favorite top, tunic and dress patterns into a maternity-friendly wardrobe.  When I was pregnant with #4 and #5, I decided to skip the expensive or unflattering maternity clothes currently in stores and wear regular tops and dresses that were either fitted and stretchy or flowy.  The only problem was near the end they were all getting to short!  So I used this method to make some longer maternity clothes that I could easily trim and re-hem into regular tops when I was done having babies.

This is a tutorial add-on that is 2 pages and includes just 2 small pieces.  The 2 included pieces are used to alter the paper pattern piece of almost any pattern that’s front piece is cut on a fold

– See more at: http://www.eymm.com/product/make-it-maternity/#sthash.wEwehJW3.dpuf

For my third test, I made the above the knee length (I didn’t hem, and I’m short, so keep  tthat in mind), with the raised empire waist, the maternity add-on (again, accidentally on both front and back), and with the nursing mod. Phew. Did you catch all that? I’m not great at taking selfies and I’m not going to share pictures of the nursing mod. The pattern piece was changed slightly throughout testing, and also I don’t feel the need to share my bra shot pictures here. For this dress I used one back piece and one front piece, although you can’t tell from the pictures, sorry about that.

Final thoughts: I’m in love with the pattern. I don’t think I’ve ever enjoyed sewing for myself as much before. Go on and give the pattern a try. I doubt you will regret it. Also, head on over to Facebook and give Everything Your Mama Made a like.

 

I’m linking up, here.

Make It and Love It

And here.

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About manningthemachine

I'm Laura. Mama to four, and wife to one awesome guy. I'm ever so slightly sarcastic. Just a little bit. I like to quote movies, but since our house is managed by little people, most of those quotes come from kiddie shows. At least my husband generally gets the references. It makes me feel less awkward. I took sewing lessons starting at the age of 8, through the Kids Can Sew program. I took lessons for four or five years. Then I became a snotty teen and decided sewing was lame. I've repented of my ways, and enjoy sewing for my little ones. And sometimes other people. And almost never for myself. Oh hey. My blog name. "Manning The Machine." I think it's probably only funny if you know me in real life. And even then, maybe it is only funny to me. My last name is Manning. This is a blog about my sewing. Manning The (Sewing) Machine. Do you get it? Do you? No. That's fine. I think it's funny even if you don't.
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